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Saturday, April 30, 2016

Thursday, April 28, 2016

TREE SWALLOW FLEDGLING, LAKE WILCOX PARK, RICHMOND HILL, ON

    Notice the fuzzy apperance of the feathers; this is typical of a fledgling.  In the second photo you can see the male Tree Swallow, probably the fledgling's father.  They both flew off together.




FEMALE RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, LAKE WILCOX PARK, RICHMOND HILL, ON


TREE SWALLOW TAKING OFF, LAKE WILCOX PARK, RICHMOND HILL, ON



BELTED KINGFISHER, LAKE WILCOX PARK, RICHMOND HILL, ON


YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, LAKE WILCOX PARK, RICHMOND HILL, ON

   The Yellow-rumped Warblers in both photos are of the Myrtle subspecies, as can be seen from their white throats (vs. Audobon subspecies yellow throats).  The warbler in the first photo is a male, it has a yellow cap on its head ( the female doesn't).  In the second photo, which is a different bird, you can't make out enough of the head to determine its sex.
   



FEMALE DOWNY WOODPECKER, LAKE WILCOX PARK, RICHMOND HILL, ON



DIVING MUTE SWANS, CRANBERRY MARSH, LY DE SHORES CONSERVATION AREA, WHITBY, ON




HERMIT THRUSH IN BACKYARD, THORNHILL, ON

   These photos were taken in the backyard of the house in Thornhill.  The third photo was taken through two glass doors.
   We can ID this bird as a Hermit Thrush as follows:
  • Brown upper body.
  • Smudged spots on breast.
  • Complete white eye-ring.
  • Reddish tail.  This is what sets it apart from other similar thrushes.  You can see the contrast between the reddish tail and brown body.