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Sunday, January 31, 2016

AMERICAN ROBIN, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL


KILLDEER, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL


TURKEY VULTURE, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL

   In the first photo you can just make out the red head of the Turkey Vulture.



YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL


RED-SHOULDERED HAWK & LIMPKIN, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL

   We thought this was an interesting photo seeing the hawk and  Limpkin together, but also because the hawk is on the ground.


BREEDING EASTERN MEADOWLARK, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL


REFLECTION OF A LIMPKIN, OIL WELL PARK, IMMOKALEE, FL


SNOWY EGRET, EAGLE LAKES COMMUNITY PARK, NAPLES, FL


ROSEATE SPOONBILL ON A TREE, EAGLE LAKES COMMUNITY PARK, NAPLES, FL


BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON, EAGLE LAKES COMMUNITY PARK, NAPLES, FL

   This Black-crowned Night-Heron is in the process of molting from a juvenile to an adult.  This generally occurs this time of year.  The bird has the black crown of an adult, but still has the yellow on the bill of a juvenile.  It does not yet have the black back of an adult.


Tuesday, January 26, 2016

AN OSPREY IN THE WATER AMONG FRIENDS, CLAM PASS BEACH, NAPLES, FL

   I thought these were unusual photos; this is the first time We have seen a Osprey in the water like this especially with other birds nearby.







PAINTED BUNTING, SUGDEN REGIONAL PARK, NAPLES, FL

   These photos were taken at or near a birdfeeder across a canal at the western edge of Sugden Regional Park.  The first two photos are of  female Painted Buntings.  The last photo is of a male Painted Bunting.
   The male Painted Bunting is unmistakeable, with a dark blue head, bright green back and red front and rump (can't see the rump in this photo).  All the colors in this photo are muted because of the shadow.  The female Painted Bunting has a bright green back and head and a yellow or yellowish-green front.  You can see these bright colors in the firsr photo; in the second photo they are muted.
   The Painted Bunting is a new species to our Life List, which now stands at 263.




INDIGO BUNTING, SUGDEN REGIONAL PARK, NAPLES, FL

   These photos were taken at or near a bird feeder across a canal at the western edge of Sugden Regional Park.  The first three photos are of a nonbreeding male Indigo Bunting.  The last photo is of a female Indigo Bunting.
   The nonbreeding Indigo Bunting is basically brown with patches of bright blue.  When breeding the male becomes completely blue.  The female Indigo Bunting is also basically brown with a blue tail and some blue on its wungs.